A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z





A:

ALL-STAR

A player slected to participate in the annual All-Star game.

ALL-STAR GAME

In January of every year, major-league hockey players compete in the All-Star game. The best players of the Eastern and Western Divisions are selected by members of the NHL Writers Association. The coaches of each team are permitted to choose additional players. The World Hockey Association (WHA) also has an All-Star game in midseason.

ART ROSS TROPHY

An annual award to the NHL player who leads the league in scoring points at the end of the regular season. The trophy is given in honor of Arthur Howie Ross, one of hockey's early great players. He also was the manager-coach of the Boston Bruins. The trophy was first awarded in 1947.

ASSIST

A player is credited with an assist when he passes the puck to a teammate, and his teammate scores a goal. However, no more than two players can be credited with assists on any single goal For example, if one player passes the puck to one of his teammates and the teammate passes to another teammate, who scores a goal, both players who passed will be credited with an assist.

ATTACK ZONE

The area between each team's blue line and the goal line. When the team in possession of the puck crosses the middle of the playing area and then moves across the defending team's blue line, the team with the puck is in the attack zone

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B:

BACK CHECK

To skate back into your own defensive zone when your opponents have gained possession of the puck, and check an opponent as closely as possible.

BACKHAND SHOT

A shot or pass made with the back part of the stick's blade.

BACK PASS

Passing the puck to a teammate who is coming up from behind the player is possession of the puck.

BAD MAN

And hockey player who picks fights, checks much harder than necessary or joins a fight between two other players

BANANA BLADE

A curved blade on a hockey stick. Hockey officials realized that this type of stick was giving offensive players too much of an advantage, so rules were made to reduce the curve in the blade.

BENCH MINOR PENALTY

A player charged with a bench minor penalty must sit in the penalty box for two minutes. It differs from a minor penalty in that thet person breaking the rules need not be the person who must sit in the penalty box. Rule 27 (b) states: "A Bench Minor penalty involves the removal from the ice of one player for the team against which the penalty is awarded, for period of two minutes Any player of that team may be named by the Manager or the Coach to serve that penalty."

For example, if a manager, trainer, team official, or executive uses profane language, or throws something on the ice, or tries to interfere with an official, the referee can impose a minor penalty. Since managers, trainers, and team executives are not players, they are not on the ice. Still, the team must be penslized. So a player is named to serve the penalty for two minutes.

BILL MASTERSON TROPHY

An annual award to "the National Hockey League player who best exemplifies the qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship, and dedication to hockey." A player must participate in at least fifty games to be eligible. The trophy is awarded in honor of Bill Masterson of the Minnesota North Stars.

BLUE LINE

The two lines dividing the attack zone from the neutral zone. Each line is one foot wide and 60 feet from each goal.

BOARDS

The wooden wall circling the rink.

BOARD CHECK

To check an opposing player into the boards. Also called boarding.

BODY CHECK

When the player checks his opponent by using his hip or shoulder, or some other part of his body.

BREAK

The ability to start skating quickly, in any direction from a standing position.

BREAKAWAY

A swift rush by a player in possession of the puck. A breakaway enables a player to get away from his opponents, skate down the ice, and have a clear shot at the goal.

BUTT END

To jab an opponent with the top of the hockey stick. Very similar to spearing. It is illegal to jab an opponent in such a way.

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C:

CALDER TROPHY

An annual award to the player who is the most proficient in his first year of competition in the NHL. The winner is selected by the NHL Hockey Writers Association. To be eligible, a player must not have played in more than twenty-five NHL games during the season. If the player tried to make the NHL team for two years before making the team, he must not hav played in more than six hockey games in each of those two years.

CARRY THE PUCK

To skate while in possession of the puck.

CENTER

One of the three regular offensive players. The center engages in the face-off at the start of each of the three playing periods and also after a goal has been scored. Such face-offs take place at center ice.

CENTER ICE

The area of the playing rink between the two blue lines. Also called Neutral Zone.

CENTERING PASS

When a player in possession of the puck skating along one side of the rink passes the puck to a teammate who is closer to the center of the rink.

CHANGE ON THE FLY

To charge the forward line while play is going on.

CHARGING

To charge across the ice in order to body-check an opponent. It is illegal for the charging player to take more than two skating steps, and if he does, he will be penalized. It is also charging to make unnecessary contact with opposing goalie.

CHECKING

There are three ways of checking-any kind of body contact, such as body check or cross check; taking the puck away from an opponent; and guarding an opposing player.

CLEAR THE PUCK

To get the puck away from the area in front of the goal.

CRISSCROSS

An offensive player. The wingemen cross the ice and change sides.

CROSSBAR

The top section of the goal. It is a two-ince pipe, four feet off the ice, connected to the two side posts.

CROSS CHECK

To check an opponent with the stick while both hands are on the stick and no part of the stick is on the ice. A cross check is illegal.

CROSSOVER

A meathod of skating. The player skates over the ice alternately crossing one foot over the other.

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D:

DEFENSEMAN

One of two players on a hockey team who specialize in defensive play. They assist the goalkeeper in preventing opponents from scoring.

DEFENSIVE ZONE

The area between the blue line nearest to a team's own goal and their goal line.

DEKE

To feint or fake, trying to get an opponent out of position.

DELAYED PENALTIES

Although there are six men on each team, at least four must be on the ice at all times. But suppose two members of the team are already in the penalty box and a third player is charged with a penalty? In such situation, the third player goes to the penalty box and a substitute enters the game in his place. However, the penalty time that he must serve has really not yet started. As soon as one of the first players in the box is permitted to return to the ice, then the third player really begins to serve his penalty time. His subsistute will leave the game so that, once more, the team has four players on the ice.

DRAG

Slowing down from a swift dash over the ice. To do so, one skate blade is "dragged" in a flat position.

DROP PASS

A form of backward pass. The player in possession of the puck skates forward, then suddenly leaves the puck for his teammate coming up behind hime. Or he can nudge the puck gently back toward his trailing teammate.

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E:

ELBOWING

Striking an opponent with the elbow. It is illegal.

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F:

FACE-OFF

This is how play begins in hockey. Opposing players stand in one of the face-off circles with the blades of their sticks on the ice one foot apart. The referee drops the puck between the two stick blades, and the players try to gain possession themselves or pass to a teammate.

FACE-OFF CIRCLE

One of five large circles on the ice where face-offs can occur. There is one circle at center ice and two circles in each of the attack zones.

FACE MASK

A protective mask worn by goalkeepers.

FLIP PASS

A type of pass that sends the puck a few inches above the ice so that the puck can "hop over" an opponent's stick.

FOLLOW-IN

After a player takes a shot at the goal, it is good strategy for him to move quickly in toward the goal-to "follow in" his shot-so that he is in position to capture a rebound or a clearing pass.

FORECHECK

To check an opponent in his own defensive zone and prevent him from starting an offensive rush.

FOREHAND SHOT

The most natural kind of shot. A right-handed shooter has his left hand at the top of the stick, the right hand lower down on the shaft of the stick. This is reversed for left-handed players.

FORWARD

The forwards on a team are the left wing, the center, and the right wing. They are the players who generally lead the attack.

FORWARD LINE

Refers to the center and two forwards who form the attack unit.

FREEZE THE PUCK

To maintain possession of the puck, passing it back and forth, but without attacking or trying for a goal. When a game is almost over and one team is holding a narror lead, that team will try to hang onto, or freeze, the puck, keeping the other team from gaining possession, until the final buzzer sounds.

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G:

GOAL

There are two meanings for the term goal. Scoring a goal means passing the hockey puck into the "cage," which scores one point for the attacking team. It also refers to the goal itself- the metal and nylon-net structure which is guarded by the goalkeeper. The goals must be located ten feet from each end of the rink, in the center of a red line drawn across the width of the ice. The vertical goalposts are set into the ice. Ther are six feet apart and four feet high, and are joined by a crossbar. White nylon cord, usually refered to as the net, is attached to the frame.

GOAL CREASE

An area in front of each goal, four feet by six feet, marked out with red lines. An offensive player who is not in possession of the puck cannot remain inside the goal crease. However, he is permitted to skate through the crease if he does have possession of the puck.

GOALKEEPER, OR GOALIE

The player assigned to guard the goal.

GOALKEEPER'S PENALTIES

Hockey recognizes the fact that a goalkeeper may be more important to a team than the other players. So a goalkeeper is not penalized for an offense (or infraction of the rules) that would call for a major or minor penalty. The manager or coach of his team names another player to serve the penalty time, and the player who has been named must sit in the penalty box just as if he himself had been guilty of breaking the rules. However, if the goalkeeper has been guilty of two major penalties, he is automatically guilty of a game misconduct penalty. He is fined and must leave the game.

GOAL LINE

The red line running between the goal posts and extending the width of the rink.

GOAL MOUTH

The area just in front of the goal line and the crease lines.

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H:

HARD STICK

When one player passes to another, the receiving player's stick should "give" somewhat, just the way a baseball player draws back his hand slightly when he makes a catch. "Hard stick" means that the players receiving the pass is holding his stick so tightly and rigidly that it does not move back at all. That makes control of the puck difficult, and sometimes it bounces off the receiver's stick blade.

HAT TRICK

When a player scores three goals in a game, he has "turned the hat trick."

HIGH STICK

Carrying the hockey stick above shoulder level. High-sticking is illegal.

HIP CHECK

To check an opponent with the hip.

HOCKEY TEAM

Consists of six position: goalie, two defensemen, center, left winger and right winger.

HOLDING

Using the hands illegally to hold or stop an opponent.

HOOK CHECK

A fast sweep of the stick close to the ice in an attempt to take the puck away from an opposing player. Also called sweep check.

HOOKING

Using the blade of the stick to hook or grip an opponsing player from behind. Hooking is illegal, although a hook check is not.

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I:

ICING (ICING THE PUCK)

Intentionally shooting the puck from behind the center red line, so that it passes through the other team's zone and over the goal line. The puck is brought back, and there is a face-off at one of the circles near the offending team's goal.

INTERFERENCE

To hinder a player moving down the ice if he does not have possession of the puck. Interference is illegal. It is also considered interference if a player deliberately knocks the stick from an opposing player's hands, or if he prevents a player who dropped his stick from picking it up.

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J:

N/A

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K:

KICKING (AN OPPONENT)

Any player who kicks or tries to kick an opponent during play receives a match penalty. At the end of five minutes, a substitute can play in place of the banished player.

KICKING THE PUCK

It is legal to kick the puck during a game, but a goal cannot be scored on a kicked puck. However, if a player kicks the puck and it deflects off anopponent (any opposing player except the goalkeeper) into the net, then a goal is scored.

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L:

LIE

The angle made by the shaft of the stick and the blade.

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M:

MAJOR PENALTY

A serious infraction of the rules, such as deliberately spearing or slashing an opponent. A major penalty calls for five minutes in the box for the offending player. But it can be much more serious if the offending player hits an opponent on the head or face with his stick or continues to repeat the same kind of fouls.

MATCH PENALTY

Any penalty, or series of penalties, that will cause a player to be barred from the ice for the rest of the game.

MATCH MISCONDUCT PENALTY

When a player has been guilty of misconduct and is ordered off the ice for the rest of the game.

MINOR PENALTY

A two-minute penalty during which a player must sit in the penalty box.

MISCONDUCT PENALTY

A ten-minute penalty. There are many reasons for a referee to impose a misconduct penalty on a player. Among them are using bad or abusive language or showing lack of respect for the decisions of an official; banging on the boards with a hockey stick; refusing to go directly to the penalty box when ordered to do so by the referee; threatening to strike one of the officials; or if a player has been in a fight which has been broken up and tries to start the fight again.

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N:

NET

The nylon cord at the rear of the goal cage.

NETMINDER

Another name for goalkeeper.

NEUTRAL ZONE

The area of the hockey rink between the two blue lines.

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O:

OFFSIDE

When an attacking player moves over the blue line into the attack zone. Play is stopped and started again with a face-off. An offside is also called when a puck is passed over more than one line and becomes a two-line pass.

OVERTIME

During the course of regular season play, a hockey game can end in a tie, and there is no overtime. But in the Stanley Cup play-offs, there must be a winner. If the teams are tired at the end of a game, player is continued after a face-off. The first team to score a goal wins. If 20 minutes elapses without a goal, an intermission is called. There is a short rest periodl then another face-off takes place at center ice.

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P:

PASS

When a player in possession of the puck sends the puck along the ice to a teammate.

PASSOUT

A pass by an attacking player from behind an opponent's goal to a teammate who is in front of the goal.

PENALTY

When a player or another member of a team (coach, trainer, etc.) breaks the rules, he or his team is subject to a penalty.

PENALTY BOX

An enclosed area just outside the rink where penalized players go when they are ordered off the ice. Also known as "the box".

PENALTY KILLER

When a player is sent to the penalty box, his team is at a disadvantage because it has fewer players than the other team. The short-handed team often tries to keep possession of the puck until it is at full strength again. That is a job for the penalty killers. These players are adept at passing the puck to each other, avoiding checks, and keeping possession for their team until the penalized player can return to the ice. They have "killed" the penalty time.

PENALTY SHOT

A free shot on the goal.

PERIOD

A hockey play period is 20 minutes. Three 20-minute periods make a hockey game.

POINT

The term point has two meanings in hockey. A team scores one point when a goal is made, or a player scores a point for his personal total when he makes a goal or an assist. Point can also refer to the positions taken by players just inside their attack zone.

POKE CHECK

A quick thrust, or "poke," with the stick in order to knock the puck away from an opponent's stick.

POWER PLAY

When one team is short-handed because a player is in the penalty box, the opposing team will do its best to score a goal by rushing as many players as possible against their outnumbered opponents. In this way, the attacking team will try to overpower its opponent.

PUCK

An official hockey puck is made of vulcanized rubber. It is one inch thick and three inches in diameteer, and weighs between 5 1/2 to 6 ounces.

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Q:

N/A

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R:

REBOUND

When the puck is passed or shot at the goal, it may strike the rink boards, an upright of the goal or even another player. It will rebound off the object it strikes.

RED LINE

The line across the width of the rink which divides the playing area in half.

REFEREE

The official who controls the play.

REVERSING

To swing around while skating forward so that the skater is still going in the same direction but is now skating backwards.

ROUGHING

Punching or shoving an opponent. Roughing is illegal.

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S:

SAVE

Blocking of a shot by the goalkeeper.

SCRAMBLE

Fast action when players bang into each other trying to gain possession of the puck.

SHORTHANDED

When a team has fewer than six players on the ice because of penalties.

SHOT ON GOAL

When a player shoots the puck toward the goal cage.

SHOULDER CHECK

To check an opponent by using a shoulder.

SLAP SHOT

The slap shot is probably the fastest shot in hockey, sending the puck to speeds up to 110 miles an hour. It is executed by drawing back the stick with the bottom hand far down the stick. Then the stick swishes down and bangs the puck.

SLASHING

Swinging the stick viciously at an opponent. Slashing is illegal.

SLOT

The area from about 12 to 18 feet in front of the net, between the two face-off circles.

SLOW ICE

Hard ice is best for hockey games. If the ice becomes watery or mushy it slows the skaters and is called slow ice.

SMOTHERING THE PUCK

When a player falls on the puck, he is said to be smothering the puck.

SNAKE

To whip or lash out at the puck with the stick.

SOLO DASH

A one-man rush toward the goalie while is possession of the puck.

SPEARING

Jabbing an opponent with the stick. About the same as butt-ending. Spearing is illegal.

STICK-HANDLE

Moving the puck along the ice with the blade of the hockey stick.

SWEEP CHECK

Attempting to gain possession of the puck from an opponent by sweeping the stick in a half circle toward the puck.

SWEEP SHOT

To shoot the puck with a sweeping motion of the stick.

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T:

THREE ON TWO

When three attack players-usually the forwards-converge on the goal and only two defensive players are in position to stop them.

TIGHT TURN

To turn in a very short arc while skating.

TRAILER

A player who follows his teammates on the attack, in position to take a drop pass.

TRIPPING

To deliberately trip an opponent.

TWO ON ONE

When two attack players converge on the goal and only one defensive player-the goalkeeper-is in position to stop them.

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U:

N/A

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V:

N/A

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W:

WASHOUT

When a washout signal is given by the referee, it means that the goal scored has been disallowed, because of a penalty or some other infraction of the rules. When the washout signal is given by the linesman, it means that there is no icing of the puck or no offside.

WINGMEN

The two offensive forwards-the right wing and left wing-who flank the center. Together they make up the complete attack unit.

WRIST PASS

A pass executed by a quick flick of the wrist.

WRIST SHOT

Same as a wrist pass, except that must more force is used. A wrist shot can skim over the ice with great speed, although it is not usually as fast as a slap shot.

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X:

N/A

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Y:

N/A

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Z:

ZAMBONI

A machine that re-freezes the surface of the ice during intermission. In a hockey game it is customary to cheer for the zamboni.

ZIGZAG

A series of crossover skating moves taken by the puck carrier so that he can avoid an opponent.

ZONE

The three areas of a rink created by the blue lines. The attacking zone is that area farthest away from the goal a team is defending. Next xomes the neutral zone, which is the area between the two blue lines, around center ice. Finally, there is the defending zone where the team's goal is located.










All information comes from the book Hockey Talk for Beginners by Howard Liss and Frank Robbins. All information seen on this page is used without permission. No infringment is intended.

If your find any inaccuracies/spelling mistakes/rule changes, etc. please e-mail me!